A Quote Off My Shelf

“The literary critic’s preoccupation with the how of biblical writing is not frivolous. It is evidence of an artistic delight in verbal beauty and craftsmanship, but it is also part of an attempt to understand what the Bible says. In a literary text it is impossible to separate what is said from how it is said, content from form.” –How To Read The Bible As Literature… And Get More Out Of It by Leland Ryken. 

A Quote Off My Shelf

“Well,” said the boy, “in my family everyone is born in the air, with his head at exactly the height it’s going to be when he’s an adult, and then we all grow toward the ground.  When we’re fully grown up or, as you can see, grown down, our feet finally touch.  Of course, there are a few of us whose feet never reach the ground no matter how old we get, but I suppose it’s the same in every family.”  …….

“You certainly must be very old to have reached the ground already.”

“Oh no,” said Milo, seriously.  “In my family we all start on the ground and grow up, and we never know how far until we actually get there.”

“What a silly system.”  The boy laughed.  “Then your head keeps changing its height and you always see things in a different way?  Why, when you’re fifteen, things won’t look at all the way they did when you were ten, and at twenty everything will change again.”

“I suppose so,” replied Milo, for he had never really thought about the matter.” The Phantom Tollbooth by Norton Juster, pg. 104-105

(My Currently Reading over the Christmas and New Years holidays)

Want to see more fun quotes from The Phantom Tollbooth? You can find more here: http://ashleyandstuart.blogspot.com/2011/11/phantom-tollbooth-quotes.html?m=1

It’s Ok to Ask For Directions (Reflections on The Scarlet Letter and Reading Classics in General)

Are you ready to hear something possibly surprising about this book reviewer? Here goes: sometimes, I read a book and I weigh every word, I analyze the themes and motifs, let the plot sink in, evaluate the characters, then I close the book and…have no idea what I just read means. Sometimes the scenes of the book tumble and jumble in my head, noisily knocking around like Mexican Jumping Beans and I can make no sense of them. I can grasp no common thread or foundation to build on.

This must mean, you might say, that it’s a badly written book. But what if this book is a classic? What if this book is universally recognized by literary scholars as a Madonna of American Literature? Then, you would be forced to say what I was forced to see, that this blogger was missing something and needed help.

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