Rapunzel and Mark Antony Get Tangled

tangled

When I first heard that Disney was bringing my favorite princess to the silver screen I was excited. Rapunzel was always one of my favorite fairy tales. As a little girl, I dreamed of having floor-length hair like hers by the time I was 20. But as I reach behind my back and feel the ends of my hair brushing just beneath my shoulders I am reminded that not all dreams come true.

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Not Another Esther Story

⭐️

(A 300-words-or-less review)

http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/1934554332/ref=as_li_qf_sp_asin_il_tl?ie=UTF8&camp=1789&creative=9325&creativeASIN=1934554332&linkCode=as2&tag=livinheassha-20&linkId=7ZP5N2XIQ4LZ6XMT

The only interesting, genuine and complex characters were the villain and his equally-evil mother; I found the heroine utterly unconvincing. In addition to this, I disagreed with the premise of the book. The villain proposes marriage to a young woman in a small Christian village and the young woman (Adelina) at first refuses, saying she cannot, under God’s law, marry an unbeliever but when the man threatens to kill all her people if she doesn’t marry him, she capriciously gives her assent. If this was portrayed as a weakness of hers, the consequences of which she must bear in the years to come, I would not take issue with the story but because this ungodly action is uplifted as noble, selfless and righteous, the subsequent trials of the Princess being written in a tone to draw our pity as against grave injustice, manipulating our emotions to feel sorry for Adelina though she but reaped the consequences of what she sowed, I cannot commend it.

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The God Who is There by Francis Schaeffer

⭐️⭐️⭐️⭐️⭐️

http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/0830819479/ref=as_li_qf_sp_asin_il_tl?ie=UTF8&camp=1789&creative=9325&creativeASIN=0830819479&linkCode=as2&tag=livinheassha-20

Review below written in 2012, when I was 17

Reading Francis Schaeffer is like falling out of a fishing boat into the ocean. Both the depth and vastness is overwhelming. It takes but a few pages before you begin floundering and coughing up sea water.

And Mr. Schaeffer’s subject matter, philosophy, is like studying the cellular structure of the vast, deep, sea’s water molecules. It is the ocean itself–culture–that he is studying, but with a stronger magnification glass than most people trouble themselves to pull out. Most are satisfied with the view from the boat and their sweeping observations of the ocean’s surface but with the extra magnification comes a stronger, more comprehensive, more precise, understanding of the whole ocean.

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